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Thursday, July 27, 2006

Clowes' "Death Ray" to be a movie


Once again, I pulled this news item from the ICV2 website. Looks like Jack Black's production company is getting set to do a film adaptation of one of the greatest single-issue comics ever... Daniel Clowes' "Death Ray" story from EIGHTBALL #23. Previous adaptations of Clowes' works include Ghost World and Art School Confidential, both great non-mainstream films. (You've seen them, right? Right?)

I was blown away (heh) by this story... it's absolutely compelling and really highlights what comic book storytelling can be... a unique voice best portrayed by this specific artform - comics.

The movie should be interesting.

3 Comments:

At 7/27/2006 3:00 PM, Blogger stymieresh said...

Why are the Death Ray's dialog bubbles always covered by the panel? How are they going to do THAT in a movie?

Peopl
wil
tal
lik
thi
?

 
At 7/28/2006 12:57 AM, Blogger amoorefan2 said...

i'm there thats all i'm saying!!!!

super psyched

 
At 7/28/2006 11:57 AM, Blogger Bill at Comix Connection said...

stymieresh - Clowes' storytelling style is unique to say the least. When there is "superheroing" going on, it's very brief and the panels are so traditionally laid out that we all know what is going on anyway, having read thousands of comic books ourselves. The reader almost writes the dialog himself, with a little prodding from those chopped-off word balloons. Clowes' emphasis is always on the mundane aspects of life, the "boring parts" between the "exciting parts" of life which are in fact, much more interesting, at least in his hands.

Plus it gives the feeling of overhearing snippets of conversation between characters that we aren't privy to.

Or something.

 

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